Friday, January 22, 2021

The best of BADA

A roundup of the art worth seeing at BADA

 

The BADA Antiques & Fine Art Fair on Chelsea’s Duke of York Square is an annual showcase of art and antiques that range in price from £100 to £1 million. Here, The Steeple Times picks three of our favourite items on display that suit a wide range of budgets.

 

'Group of People' by Laurence Stephen Lowry
‘Group of People’ by Laurence Stephen Lowry

A 1961 pencil drawing of a group of down and outs by Laurence Stephen Lowry (1887 – 1976) is poignant in the wake of our coverage of Gina and Alan Miller’s Hope Springs charity concert last Tuesday that included a choir made up entirely of homeless people. With an almost non-existent background, the focus is on the faces of this disjointed collection of individuals. Priced at £79,950 and available through The Trinity House gallery, the critic Edward Mullins sums up Lowry’s character very aptly in the quote: “He doesn’t belong to anybody. He belongs to a different kind of tradition that of the English isolated eccentric. They are all isolated freaks”. A sad indication of how society functions today but nonetheless, a fine work.

 

"Ducks returning to the decoy at daybreak" by Sir Peter Scott
“Ducks returning to the decoy at daybreak” by Sir Peter Scott

A highlight for anyone interested in nature is most certainly an oil on canvas by Sir Peter Markham Scott (1909 – 1989). Captioned “Ducks returning the decoy at daybreak” and painted by the son of the explorer Sir Robert Falcon Scott (1868 – 1912), this painting is priced at £16,000 available through Rountree Tryon Galleries. Sir Peter Scott was “one of the most versatile Englishmen of his generation, being an accomplished artist, naturalist, international sportsman, conservationist and man of action”. Amongst his achievements were to rescue the Hawaiian Goose from extinction. If only there were more like him today.

 

Sim Fine Art's showcases London burning during the Blitz
Sim Fine Art’s stand showcases London burning during the Blitz

On the Sim Fine Art stand, a most unusual showcase of the art of Second World War firemen has been put together by Sim Fine Art. Affordable – with prices ranging from £250 to £12,500 – these simple works show the ordinary moments in war from the perspectives of those who tried to stop London burning. They are timely reminders of how as quickly a city can be built, it can easily be destroyed.

 

BADA Antiques & Fine Art Fair, Duke of York Square, London, SW3. Open to the public until 25th March. Tickets are £10 per person or £15 for one that admits two people.

 

 

Subscribe to our free once daily email newsletter here:

     

    The Steeple Times
    We research and background check our articles. If you believe we have made and error in some detail please get in touch, we seek always to write the truth and stand against a press owned by a self selected few. Please help us, we will accept all your likes, subscriptions and anonymous suport. The Editor and his team at the Steeple Times.
    Advertisement

    2 COMMENTS

    1. Sir Peter Scott was a great man. They don’t build them like him anymore. His paintings are phenomenal and I love the books also.

    LEAVE A REPLY

    Please enter your comment!
    Please enter your name here

    Advertisement
    Advertisement

    SUBSCRIBE FOR FREE DAILY NEWS


    Please subscribe and share this site, it really helps us grow and become better. Your data is safe and secure, The Steeple Times will send a single email to you personally at noon each day.

    2,546FansLike
    2,068FollowersFollow
    10,739FollowersFollow
    129SubscribersSubscribe

    Most Popular

    Katie UKIPpers

    Put a Bloody Bin in it!

    Ghastly Ghislaine Goes 50/1

    A BBC Balls-up

    A French Farce

    MacBook Maxwell

    Theresa The Tea Leaf

    Lock Him Up 2021!

    A Chelsea Essential

    Dry January 2021 CANCELLED

    Lockup Lunacy

    Sorry is the Shiftiest Word

    Bombastic Basham Bashes Back

    Archewell OFF!

    Getaway Ghislaine

    Oysters Ahoy!

    A Christmas Nightmare